Intro to APIs and Logging In

Introduction and the Login API

APIs can be used to extract and update DeployHub Objects. The most common use for APIs is to integrate DeployHub into your continuous delivery engine for a continuous configuration management and deploy process. APIs are generally used for executing deployments, but can also be used to automatically update Component and Application versions.

Object Accessibility

APIs rely User and Group access to determine if the call is allowed. The Objects that are accessible via the API are restricted based on the logged-in user. Only Objects that are contained within the user’s home Domain and any Subdomains are accessible via the API.

If a requested object does not have “read” permission then it cannot be accessed via the API. Similarly, attempting to modify Objects which do not have the appropriate “change” permission is also prohibited. In such cases, the “success” flag returned is “false” and the error is “Permission Denied”.

Logging in to Establishing a Connection

When issuing calls to the API, the client application must either first issue a “login” call, specifying the username and password or must specify the username and password in each individual call to the API.

Qualify the Name of the Object

When specifying an Object by name you can always qualify the name by pre-pending it with the name of the Domain in which it is contained. The name of the Domain should be separated from the name of the object by a period.

Example:

    GLOBAL.USA.Development.demoenv

This specifies that the "demoenv" Environment required can be found in the "Development" Subdomain of Domain "USA" which is a Subdomain of "GLOBAL".

Use the object’s internal ID

Every Object has a unique ID. This is used internally in the database as a primary/foreign key. An Object is given an ID when it is first created and that ID never changes or is re-used, even if the object itself is deleted. Therefore, if you know the ID of the object you can specify that in the API and RE will know which to object you’re referring to, even if the name is not unique.

The query tools in the API return the object’s internal ID as well as its name. Once you know the ID you can use it in subsequent calls to the API.

To use the ID, just place it where you would normally place the object’s name. The APIs will assume you’re specifying an ID if the name given is fully-numeric.

Do not create objects with fully numeric names - DeployHub will not be able to determine if this is an object id or the object name.

Using cURL to access the API

Here is an example of how to use cURL to access the API.

First, we need to login. This operation will return a session ID. We use cURL’s –cookie-jar option to store this session ID in the file C:\temp\session.txt

  curl --data "user=omadmin&pass=ompassword" --cookie-jar c:\temp\session.txt http://mac:8080/dmadminweb/API/login

If the username/password combination is correct, the user is logged in and the success indication is returned. Now we can call any of the other API interfaces by specifying the same file in which we stored the session ID returned from the login call.

For example, this will return a JSON array containing all the servers in our home and Subdomains to which we have view access.

  curl --data "all=Y" --cookie c:\temp\session.txt http://mac:8080/dmadminweb/API/servers

Login

When issuing calls to the API, the client application must either first issue a “login” call, specifying the username and password or must specify the username and password in each individual call to the API.

REST Api Endpoint

HTTP Verb URL
GET /dmadminweb/API/login

Parameters

Name Located in Value Required Schema
user query User Id Yes string
pass query Password for User Yes string

Responses

Code Description Schema
200 The result will include a cookie. Include this cookie for subsequent calls to APIs. success
Last modified July 9, 2020: small cleanup (b45ee8f)